2021-2022 AMS-532 Fall-Spring

From Rizzo_Lab
Jump to: navigation, search

Please see http://ringo.ams.sunysb.edu/~rizzo for Rizzo Group Homepage


Instructor Dr. Robert C. Rizzo [631-632-9340, rizzorc -at- gmail (dot) com]
Course No. AMS-532
Location/Time online, Wed 11:45PM - 12:40PM
Office Hours Anytime or by appointment, Room 1-111, Dept. of Applied Math & Statistics


GENERAL INFORMATION: GENERAL INFORMATION: AMS-532 is a two semester course in which students attend and actively participate in research discussions at weekly Journal Club meetings on topics from the current literature using the skills and knowledge acquired during laboratory rotations (AMS-531), or, if they have already joined a research lab, on topics relevant to their own research projects. In the Spring, a new component is added which is devoted to Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training as mandated by the University and Federal funding agencies (e.g. NIH, NSF, DOE, DOD). Note that Journal Club and Responsible Conduct of Research are required of all PhD and Masters students.


Learning Objectives:

  • (1) Actively participate in Journal Club discussions on Computationally Biology literature.
  • (2) Hone critical reading skills and lead discussions on literature related to Laboratory Rotations (AMS-531).
  • (3) Give oral presentations on specific rotation projects performed during Laboratory Rotations (AMS-531).
  • (4) Gain training in responsible conduct of research (RCR), as mandated by the university and federal funding agencies (e.g. NIH, NSF, DOE, DOD), arranged in the following sections:
    • (i) Course Overview: Fulfilling Responsible Conduct in Research Training
    • (ii) Integrity in Scholarship
    • (iii) Scientific Misconduct
    • (iv) Mentoring
    • (v) Ownership and Authorship
    • (vi) Plagiarism
    • (vii) Data Management
    • (viii) Journalism and Science
    • (ix) Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Human Subjects
    • (x) Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Laboratory Animals


(1) Journal Club: The goal of the "Journal Club" portion of AMS-532 is for students to hone critical reading and analytic skills through group discussion of literature related to lab rotation research programs. Participants take turn being "discussion leader" who informally guides the group through a manuscript for which all Journal Club members will have read in advance of the meeting. Normally, research papers are suggested by the PI of the laboratory hosting the student. An interactive WIKI page is maintained at http://ringo.ams.sunysb.edu/index.php which list papers covered to date in Journal Club along with a Course Schedule listing each week's discussion leader.


(2) Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR): The first ten Journal Club meetings in the Spring are devoted to training in "Responsible Conduct of Research" arranged in the following sections: (1) Course Overview: Fulfilling Responsible Conduct in Research Training, (2) Integrity in Scholarship, (3) Scientific Misconduct, (4) Mentoring, (5) Ownership and Authorship, (6) Plagiarism, (7) Data Management, (8) Journalism and Science, (9) Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Human Subjects, and (10) Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Laboratory Animals. Prior to each meeting, students will view online lectures by Stony Brook faculty and read additional relevant materials, which often include case studies. The RCR meetings will be run as small group breakout sessions followed by group discussion. To fully fulfill RCR training, students must also complete a relevant RCR module, and achieve a passing grade of at least 80% on subsequent quizzes, within the web-based Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) located at www.citiprogram.org. See Course Schedule at the bottom of the WIKI page ( http://ringo.ams.sunysb.edu/index.php ) for more information including relevant links, topics, and dates for RCR meetings.


LITERATURE DISCLAIMER: Hyperlinks and manuscripts accessed through Stony Brook University's electronic journal subscriptions are provided below for educational purposes only.


PRESENTATION DISCLAIMER: Presentations may contain slides from a variety of online sources for educational and illustrative purposes only, and use here does not imply that the presenter is claiming that the contents are their own original work or research.


Journal Club Schedule (Fall & Spring) and Responsible Conduct of Research Schedule (Spring)

2021 Fall Participant Rotations or Research Group Topic References

REFERENCES SHOULD USE J. AM. CHEM. SOC. FORMAT

2021.08.25 Wed -- -- -- First year students will attend AMS-539 meeting (Faculty research presentations).
2021.09.01 Wed -- -- -- First year students will attend AMS-539 meeting (Faculty research presentations).
2021.09.08 Wed -- -- -- Organizational Meeting (First regular day of Journal Club). Dima Kozakov research presentation.
2021.09.15 Wed -- -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.09.22 Wed Hall, Carole -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.09.29 Wed Rajesh, Chandana -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.10.06 Wed Steier, Josh -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.10.13 Wed Foran, Chris -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.10.20 Wed Last, First -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.10.27 Wed Last, First -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.11.03 Wed Last, First -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.11.10 Wed Last, First -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.11.17 Wed Last, First -- -- Pabis et al; Influenza hemagglutinin drives viral entry via two sequential intramembrane mechanisms. PNAS 2020, 117, 7200-7207.
2021.11.24 Wed -- -- -- THANKSGIVING BREAK
2021.12.01 Wed -- -- -- To be determined
2022 Spring Participant Rotations or Research Group Topic References

SEMESTER STARTS WITH RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH

2022.01.26 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (1) Course Overview: Fulfilling Responsible Conduct in Research Training

Discussion of Overall Course Requirements which include:

  • View the Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship Presentation given to department chairs by professor Michael Hadjiargyrou (to be done as a group today) 2010.06.08_hadjiargyrou.pdf
  • Complete a relevant RCR module, and achieve a 80% or higher quiz grade, within the web-based Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative located at http://www.citiprogram.org
  • Following the schedule below and prior to coming to each class: (i) view the appropriate online lecture, (ii) read additional accompanying materials, and (iii) come prepared for the days discussion topics
2022.02.02 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (2) Integrity in Scholarship (Introduction to Ethics and Science)

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings (Nature articles)


Discussion

  • Why is the class important?
  • How should we behave as scientists?
  • How is science a social enterprise?
2022.02.09 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (3) Scientific Misconduct

Stony Brook Lecture


Reading


Discussion

  • From Case Study 1: Was it appropriate for Dr. Chan to promise Samantha second authorship based on performing some assays?
  • From Case Study 1: It seems clear that there is a problem with Samantha's data. What should Julio do now?
  • Why do people commit scientific misconduct?
  • What are some consequences of committing scientific misconduct?
  • Who are some of your mentors?
2022.02.16 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (4) Mentoring

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings


Discussion

  • What qualities do you want in a mentor?
  • What are the challenges associated with being a mentor?
  • What does Professor Rubin mean when he says it is very important not to burn bridges?
  • What were the problems Susan encountered with Dr. Michaels and what are some steps she could have taken to mitigate the issues?
2022.02.23 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (5) Ownership and Authorship

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings


Discussion (also from the above Columbia course)

  • Is it ever appropriate for authorship to change during a project or potential paper?
  • How should authorship roles be defined?
  • What are some abuses of authorship?
  • Describe methods/techniques you can use to be sure you are properly citing the work of others in the context of writing a paper?
  • Did Ms. Jacobs handle the proposed changes to authorship appropriately?
  • Why are acknowledgments so important?
2022.03.02 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (6) Plagiarism

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings


Discussion

  • Is plagiarism really that bad?
  • If you copy a paragraph from another sources and modify it by say 10% is that enough to not be plagiarism ? What about 20%, or 30%, or 51% ? At what percentage is it no longer plagiarism? How many words do you need to change?
2022.03.09 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (7) Data Management

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings


Discussion

  • From Case Study 1: Why shouldn't Renee be able to use the samples since she is not studying any disease associated with the samples?
  • From Case Study 2: Under what condition is copying allowed?
  • Discuss ways to keep good records so that future researchers will be able to (A) reproduce your work and (B) re-analyze your results. Include in your discussion how you you will be able to share "raw" results.
  • How many years past a publication, if asked, should a researcher be able provide "raw data"?
2022.03.16 Wed -- -- -- SPRING BREAK
2022.03.23 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (8) Journalism and Science

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings (3 Case Studies)


Discussion

  • From Case Study 1: A reporter from a major newspaper is scheduled to do a story on a drug which you think might be causing premature death among second generation mice. Do you call the reporter and disclose your concerns? Why?
  • From Case Study 2: Your adviser says that any disclosure of her secrete research o Anthrax would be illegal? What do you do? Why?
  • From Case Study 3: What do you do when you find out that there might be an undercover reporter working secretly to uncover the truth in an apparently poorly run hospital which might violate patients privacy?
2022.03.30 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (9) Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Human Subjects

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings: (Background Information, Case Studies, Helsinki Manuscript)

Discussion

  • From Human Subjects handout, Case Study 1: Was this an ethical trial? If so, why? If not, why not?
  • From Human Subjects handout, Case Study 2: Was this an ethical trial? If so, why? If not, why not? Why does the Helsinki Declaration limit the use of Placebo's?
  • From Helsinki Manuscript: Do you agree with the authors that placebo-controlled trial are in many cases necessary ? Why ?
2022.04.06 Wed Class discussion Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) (10) Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Laboratory Animals

Stony Brook Lecture


Readings (Case Studies)


Discussion

  • From Case Study 1: What are some of the troublesome issues associated with this set of experiments?
  • From Case Study 1: Does giving an animal a fatal infection constitute cruelty, especially considering the characteristics of HIV infection in humans?
  • From Case Study 1: Is it ethically appropriate to transmit intentionally a human virus in a setting that is not fully controlled?
  • From Case Study 1: If Edith were to respond that the study could not be carried out in chimpanzees, how might it be designed instead for human subjects?
  • What are some advantages of using Animals in experiments?
  • Discuss the three R's?
  • Is our class for or against Animal testing?
2022.04.13 Wed -- -- -- ROTATION/RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS
2022.04.20 Wed -- -- -- ROTATION/RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS
2022.04.27 Wed -- -- -- ROTATION/RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS
2022.05.04 Wed -- -- -- ROTATION/RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS


Required Syllabi Statements:

The University Senate Undergraduate and Graduate Councils have authorized that the following required statements appear in all teaching syllabi (graduate and undergraduate courses) on the Stony Brook Campus.. This information is also located on the Provost’s website: https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/provost/faculty/handbook/academic_policies/syllabus_statement.php


Student Accessibility Support Center Statement: If you have a physical, psychological, medical, or learning disability that may impact your course work, please contact the Student Accessibility Support Center, 128 ECC Building, (631) 632-6748, or at sasc@stonybrook.edu. They will determine with you what accommodations are necessary and appropriate. All information and documentation is confidential. Students who require assistance during emergency evacuation are encouraged to discuss their needs with their professors and the Student Accessibility Support Center. For procedures and information go to the following website: https://ehs.stonybrook.edu/programs/fire-safety/emergency-evacuation/evacuation-guide-people-physical-disabilities and search Fire Safety and Evacuation and Disabilities.


Academic Integrity Statement: Each student must pursue his or her academic goals honestly and be personally accountable for all submitted work. Representing another person's work as your own is always wrong. Faculty is required to report any suspected instances of academic dishonesty to the Academic Judiciary. Faculty in the Health Sciences Center (School of Health Technology & Management, Nursing, Social Welfare, Dental Medicine) and School of Medicine are required to follow their school-specific procedures. For more comprehensive information on academic integrity, including categories of academic dishonesty please refer to the academic judiciary website at http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/academic_integrity/index.html


Critical Incident Management: Stony Brook University expects students to respect the rights, privileges, and property of other people. Faculty are required to report to the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards any disruptive behavior that interrupts their ability to teach, compromises the safety of the learning environment, or inhibits students' ability to learn. Until/unless the latest COVID guidance is explicitly amended by SBU, during Fall 2021"disruptive behavior” will include refusal to wear a mask during classes. For the latest COVID guidance, please refer to: https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/strongertogether/latest.php